Michael Pollan - In Defense of Food - Book Event

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RAINY DAY BOOKS...


Store Event - May 20, 7:00 p.m.


Time: Wednesday, May 20, 2009 7:00 p.m.
Location: Unity Temple on The Plaza, Sanctuary, 707 W 47th Street, Kansas City, MO 64112
Phone: 913-384-3126
Title of Event: Michael Pollan for In Defense of Food

Author:� Michael Pollan, Author of the Bestselling Book, The Omnivore's Dilemma.Michael Pollan is a Contributing Editor at Harper's magazine, where he served for many years as Executive Editor, and a Contributing Editor and Writer for The New York Times Magazine.� He has written two Award-Winning Books, Second Nature: A Gardener's Education and A Place of My Own: The Education of an Amateur Builder.� His essays and articles have appeared in numerous periodicals, and he lectures widely on environmentalism, gardening, and nature.� He lives in Cornwall Bridge, Connecticut, with his wife and son.

Title:� In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto, $15.00 Softcover, ISBN 9780143114963, On Sale Date:� April 01, 2009

What:Michael Pollan will talk about his New Book, his life, his work, answer audience questions and he will autograph copies of his New Book purchased from Rainy Day Books, on our website and / or at our Author Event, that are accompanied by a Stamped Ticket.

When:� Wednesday, May 20, 2009, 7:00 PM

Where:� A Rainy Day Books and Powell Gardens Author Event at Unity Temple on The Plaza, Sanctuary, 707 W 47th Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64112

Admission Package (Click on the ADD TO SHOPPING CART button):� $15.00 plus Tax, includes from Rainy Day Books, One (1) Stamped Ticket, One (1) Guest Ticket (if needed) and One (1) Copy of In Defense of Food (Softcover) to be Autographed after the Author Presentation.� Please specify your need for One (1) Stamped Ticket and One (1) Guest Ticket (if needed) in the Notes field of your Online Order.� If you choose Option 1 for In-Store Pick-Up, then you can specify At-Event Pick-Up in the Notes field of your Online Order.� Thank you.� Book Orders can be shipped worldwide.� All Author Event Book Sales are Final and Non-Returnable.

Powell Gardens, Kansas City's Botanical Garden, is Celebrating the Opening of the Heartland Harvest Garden.� What began as a simple plan to bring back a vegetable garden well-loved by visitors in the early days of Powell Gardens has evolved into the nation�s largest edible landscape; a place to reconnect with where food comes from and to celebrate the pleasures of eating well.

Set on 12 acres, the Heartland Harvest Garden illustrates in spectacular style the journey of food from seed to plate.� Beginning with the Seed to Plate greenhouse and ending with a taste of fresh-picked produce, visitors will use all five senses to explore the origins of both everyday and unusual foods.� Education programs and an area dedicated to hands-on school programs will help teach our next generation to make wise and deliberate choices about their foods and how they are produced.

In late spring of 2009, Powell Gardens will introduce the Heartland Harvest Garden to the public by bringing together thought leaders interested in revolutionizing how people think about food and hosting a festival that celebrates the flavors of local food and wine.� For more detailed information about the Heartland Harvest Garden visit www.PowellsGardens.org



In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto
by Pollan, Michael
Format: Trade Paperback
Price: $15.00
Published: Penguin Books, 2009
Inventory Status: Coming Soon -- Available for Pre-Order Now

Add To Cart See all editions of this title.

Admission Package (Click on the ADD TO SHOPPING CART button): $15.00 plus Tax, includes from Rainy Day Books, One (1) Stamped Ticket, One (1) Guest Ticket (if needed) and One (1) Copy of In Defense of Food (Softcover) to be Autographed after the Author Presentation. Please specify your need for One (1) Stamped Ticket and One (1) Guest Ticket (if needed) in the Notes field of your Online Order. If you choose Option 1 for In-Store Pick-Up, then you can specify At-Event Pick-Up in the Notes field of your Online Order. Thank you. Book Orders can be shipped worldwide. All Author Event Book Sales are Final and Non-Returnable.


What to eat, what not to eat, and how to think about health: a manifesto for our times "Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants." These simple words go to the heart of Michael Pollan's "In Defense of Food," the well-considered answers he provides to the questions posed in the bestselling "The Omnivore's Dilemma," Humans used to know how to eat well, Pollan argues. But the balanced dietary lessons that were once passed down through generations have been confused, complicated, and distorted by food industry marketers, nutritional scientists, and journalists-all of whom have much to gain from our dietary confusion. As a result, we face today a complex culinary landscape dense with bad advice and foods that are not "real." These "edible foodlike substances" are often packaged with labels bearing health claims that are typically false or misleading. Indeed, real food is fast disappearing from the marketplace, to be replaced by "nutrients," and plain old eating by an obsession with nutrition that is, paradoxically, ruining our health, not to mention our meals. Michael Pollan's sensible and decidedly counterintuitive advice is: "Don't eat anything that your great-great grandmother would not recognize as food." Writing "In Defense of Food," and affirming the joy of eating, Pollan suggests that if we would pay more for better, well-grown food, but buy less of it, we'll benefit ourselves, our communities, and the environment at large. Taking a clear-eyed look at what science does and does not know about the links between diet and health, he proposes a new way to think about the question of what to eat that is informed by ecology and tradition rather than by the prevailing nutrient-by-nutrient approach. "In Defense of Food" reminds us that, despite the daunting dietary landscape Americans confront in the modern supermarket, the solutions to the current omnivore's dilemma can be found all around us. In looking toward traditional diets the world over, as well as the foods our families-and regions-historically enjoyed, we can recover a more balanced, reasonable, and pleasurable approach to food. Michael Pollan's bracing and eloquent manifesto shows us how we might start making thoughtful food choices that will enrich our lives and enlarge our sense of what it means to be healthy.